PHCN Privatisation Disco: Are We there Yet?

For once in recent times, I never have to fret whether my laptop is charging or not. I must tell you, it’s been comforting. I simply put my mind to use in other productive ways. Not thinking of when the lights will be restored so I can continue working.

In the past couple of weeks, I have noticed a drastic change in the power distribution of the nation. My humble abode in city of Ibadan has been enjoying an average of 16 hours per day with little interruptions which need no worries. The same can be said of my sister’s place in Lagos somewhere in Ipaja and I can’t but beam at the possibility of a vibrant power sector in the nation and how it would drive the economy as some other people would be able to carry out economic activities.

While I was still basking in the euphoria of the moment, my little niece picked up the rechargeable lamp and attempted to charge it. I asked her to drop it and she resorted to begging. “Uncle Femi please let’s charge it, you know there’s light now.” but I refused. This made me see the damage that has been done to our minds as youths. Even as there had been electricity for the past 48 hrs and the lamps were charged overnight, she still begged to charge them more. Besides the fact that further charging would damage the cells of the lamps, She saw the available electricity as an opportunity. She had done all she could with the light, ironed her clothes, watch movies, pumped water etc. yet she wanted to do more.

However it was not always like this. I was raised in a time when we had at least 18-20 hours of electricity. we never bothered or scrambled to make use of it. Even if the lights go off, it never bothered us cos we knew it won’t be long before they restored it. Gradually it started becoming bad. I remember the first time we were told the light would be rationed between two streets. It was a strange experience. Little did we know it was a prophecy of things to come. But now this is where we have found ourselves. Even as I write, I know there are still some areas been deprived of electricity. If Nigerians could have their way, they’d attempt to diffuse electricity from areas with sufficient supply to deficient areas.

PHCN recently announced generating about 4,237MW of electricity and we applaud them. The power sector has been riddled with varying scandals and attempts to restore the ailing elephant but to no avail. Just this January, the tariffs were jacked up. As for me, I have no problems whatsoever with the tariff increase as long as I can see what I’m paying for. With the privatization exercise going on in the sector should we hope for better days or it’s just another Disco?

How has electricity supply been in your area?

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